FAQs

 

Plant/Fruit/Vegetable/Flowers Questions

If you are seeing powder mold, most types are toxic to inhale, so be careful. If you already have it, there are a number of organic products to use. Serenade is one I’ve used and it works great, I’d use few applications. If you have powder mold reoccurring regularly, try increasing your airflow to drop the humidity. Conidia thrive in temperatures 55-95 degrees so changing the temperature is not really a solution. In an indoor environment, the best preventative is a sulfur burner. When the sulfur evaporates, surfaces in the environment are at a  pH that the mold cannot grow in. If your plants grow very quickly, I recommend giving two dosages. For flowering plants, do not use a sulfur evaporator after the second week. The sulphur smell tends to stick around for weeks and could taint the smell of your fruit or flowers.

Using beneficial microbes and/or fungi is the way to go. The fastest and best way to see results is to use a tea. If you are using beneficials, you need to be filtering your water. If you are on city water it is most likely treated with chemicals such as chlorine that will kill beneficials. RO filters will keep this from occurring. Also use a sugar product, as this is food for beneficial microbes. Enzymes also help in healthy root production (I use Hygrozyme).

If you overwater your tomato plant, the fruit will crack/split

If using beneficial microbes (teas, fungi, bacteria) always use reverse osmosis tap water (it takes out the chemicals that will kill the beneficial flora).  To get fast delivery of the additives and/or beneficials, you can foliar feed them (if the label states you can) or mix into a watering can for immediate watering to plants. Even if you have an Ebb & Flow, top feed them, you will see faster results.

If it isn’t something like the nutrient coloring the roots, than you can take these steps. Buy 35% hydrogen peroxide, 1 tbs/gallon, and rinse or spray the roots. SM-90 works too. If you use an enzyme product it will help the dead roots to breakdown.

The yellow spots are usually a sign of over feeding. If you are using a foliar spray it is probably this. If you have used a “bug bomb”, it could be this too. Well stop. This is all you can do, no more harm. Because plants take 2-3 days to show signs, you might see this continue for a few days, after you have stopped. Flush your plants once to ensure there is no odd build up in the pot.

Silica improves the cellular structure of the plant making it more heat and drought tolerant.

You are over watering. There could be root rot due to your over watering. Let the plant’s pot dry out, checking them regularly. If you buy a moisture meter you can begin to properly manage your moisture, and over time you will not need it. If you place you finger all the way in and you see water on your finger when you pull it out, your media is still too wet. Coir holds a lot of water. On your next round, try to cut your media with Perlite for proper aeration and drainage. If you have an automatic watering system, try manually watering for a bit. This can also be due to a massive salt build up (not usually the case). Go without nutrients for a day or two to alleviate this.

Yes. The plant stake will not only ensure that you can support your future monster, but will allow the plant to concentrate on growing fruits/flower instead of supporting its own weight.

If a plant is left sitting in a pool of water, the soil will not drain the water the way it was designed to (until the water is depleted) which means less oxygen is held in the soil because of the over saturation. It will cause the plant to suffocate slightly.

Most nutrient manufacturers today want you to use many different types of chemicals to do something simple- flower a plant. Most of these chemicals are non-organic so they don’t naturally purge out (using bio catalyst) which causes the plants to end up packed with trace chemicals. You can start by implementing organic ingredients into your cycle to replace the non-organic ones. If you really don’t want to change the nutrients, than flush 7-10 days with a salt leaching solution. Here’s a Tip: You can try letting your flower dry on the sticks if you are not already doing this. You will most likely see, smell, and taste a difference.

If it is brown mold (in the flower) the humidity is too high. More airflow or a dehumidifier is needed to prevent it. If it is white mold: If you are seeing powder mold, most types are toxic to inhale, so be careful! If it is already present there are a number of organic products to use. Serenade is one I’ve used and it works great. I’d use few applications. If you have powder mold reoccurring regularly, try increasing your airflow to drop the humidity. Conidia thrive in temperatures 55-95 degrees (so it is not a temperature related issue you can usually control). In an indoor environment, the best preventative is a sulfur burner. When the sulfur evaporates, the surfaces in the room are pH’d so that the mold cannot grow. If your plants grow very fast, I recommend giving two dosages. For flowering plants, do not use a sulfur evaporator after the second week. The smell sticks around for weeks and could taint the smell of your fruit or flowers.

It depends on the size you are ending with and the genetics of the plant you are growing. This is one you will have to judge for yourself. A common rule of thumb is: 4×4 Tray: 8-15 Plants. 4×8 Tray: 14-30 Plants